Articles

Editorial

 Photograph by Julia Cumes

Photograph by Julia Cumes

FALMOUTH MAGAZINE

In her Falmouth studio, potter Joan Lederman pulls out a rectangular box that’s filled with wet mud. The shiny silver matter was extracted from the ocean floor 4,500 meters below sea level. If you look closely, stuck in the mud’s gray coat are tiny sand-colored specks. These are called foraminifera; scientists at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute less than a mile away study these fossils for climate change. Lederman studies them, too.

 Photograph by  Kate Donovan Photography

Cape Cod Magazine

On the second-floor loft of Tuff Kookooshka's new Cataumet retail space, owner Anastassia Gonye is working on a new design. She’s stylish and cool with wavy blond hair and bright blue eyes and very matter-of-fact as she explains the shark-shaped SeaCozy that’s draped over the tables. She’s making the sleepsack wider to make room for growing feet. Next to her workspace, shelves are stuffed with fabrics and beside them lean bolts of corduroy, cotton and denim, waiting for her to experiment with later.

 Photograph by Julia Cumes

Photograph by Julia Cumes

Cape Cod Magazine

In her Falmouth studio, potter Joan Lederman pulls out a rectangular box that’s filled with wet mud. The shiny silver matter was extracted from the ocean floor 4,500 meters below sea level. If you look closely, stuck in the mud’s gray coat are tiny sand-colored specks. These are called foraminifera; scientists at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute less than a mile away study these fossils for climate change. Lederman studies them, too.

 Photograph by Sarah Beard Buckley

Photograph by Sarah Beard Buckley

Maine mAGAZINE

Maine gives a lot. The shifting seasons give writers inspiration and artists changing scenes. The expansive wilderness and preserved coastline provide companies resources and researchers discoveries. The entrepreneurial culture gives business owners courage for innovation and teachers and students a different approach to education. These 50 philanthropists and visionaries are giving back. This group of doctors, teachers, business leaders, and artists wake up every day and volunteer, create, innovate, and work towards a great Maine.

 Image Courtesy of Candlewick Press

Image Courtesy of Candlewick Press

Maine magazine

In a children’s book, stories and art collide to create a visual and literary experience that many of us hold on to throughout our lives. Children and adults remember the characters, plots, and drawings that, in a few short pages, transport us to another time and setting. Maine has been the muse of many childhood masterpieces, and we’ve rounded up a few of our favorites. 

 Photograph by Margot Cheel 

Photograph by Margot Cheel 

South Shore Living

The South Shore can often feel crowded and developed, and sometimes when you’re stopped at a traffic light, or inside your home on a colder winter day, it’s easy to lose sight of where we actually are on Earth. Photographer and pilot Margot Cheel reminds us with her aerial fine art photography. From the sky, Cheel reveals the South Shore’s wavy coastline, bright green marshes exposed during low tide, and rivers that carve a curvy path through the land, flowing through South Shore towns long before any intersection.

 Image Courtesy of Candlewick Press

Image Courtesy of Candlewick Press

South Shore Living

Kingston-based author-illustrator Timothy Basil Ering's latest book, “The Unexpected Love Story of Alfred Fiddleduckling,” was brewing for some time. The characters slowly came to life in his sketchbooks. There was a family of responsible ducks, who were always ready to fly south, a more nonchalant duckling who just wanted to play his fiddle and a hunter’s dog who liked to dance more than he liked to hunt. He kept these characters in his mind, waiting on an epiphany. “You always have to be waiting and open,” says Basil Ering. “You have all these ideas stirring and constantly waiting to land.”

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South Shore Living

Marj Bates’ tale is colorful. A Scituate High School graduate, she left her quiet hometown to explore elsewhere and decided to take a job as a long-haul trucker. “I wanted to try it so I did it for a few years,” she says simply. “I lived through it and what it taught me was that if I can drive this flipping truck through an ice storm, I can do anything, so when I said ‘I’m going to make glass beads for a living’ and my mom laughed at me I said, ‘Yeah I can. Piece of cake.’ ‘How?’ she asked. ‘Ah details—I’ll figure it out.’”

 Image Courtesy of Candlewick Press

Image Courtesy of Candlewick Press

Cape CoD mAGAZINE

“Can I tell you a story?” asks Martin Sandler in his Cotuit home office. He pulls his knee up to cross his legs, revealing his striped colored socks. His chair sways slightly, knocking his thick pine desk, which is covered with papers, binders, pens, pencils and knicknacks. Faded Life magazines fall to a slant behind him and he is completely surrounded by books—his cave of facts. Historian Martin Sandler is a man from whom you never turn down a story.

 Photograph by Kelly Chase

Photograph by Kelly Chase

Maine magazine

As I drive up I-295 North, the snowflakes are thick, sliding off my windshield and sticking to the roadside. The drive is slow, but there’s something exhilarating about driving north for a weekend of adventure.

 Photograph by Debra Fleury

Photograph by Debra Fleury

Boston magazine

Artist Debra Fleury spent her childhood summers searching Cape Cod’s tidal rivers for shells and sea creatures. These days the MassArt grad continues to be a keen observer of the natural world: “I’m the kind of person who will spend 30 minutes looking at a tree,” says Fleury, who translates her observations, sketches, and thoughts into elaborate sculptures in her Somerville studio.

 Photograph by Patryce Bak

Photograph by Patryce Bak

Maine magazine

Head inland and discover Maine’s many freshwater lakes that are surrounded by trees and dotted with old-fashioned camps. Each body of water has its own appeal, with varied depth, remoteness, and boating and fishing opportunities, but all offer quiet respite and slower-paced vacations.

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NEW ENGLAND LIVING

Boston’s Seaport is booming. In the past 10 years, this neighborhood that sat vacant for decades has seen the advent of high-rises sprouting on top of former parking lots, tony condos, business headquarters and posh new restaurants and hotels. The inventive new spaces and concepts inspired the area’s moniker, the Innovation District, but older businesses (some a century old) and historic sections maintain the old Boston charm. 

 Photograph by Sarah Beard Buckley

Photograph by Sarah Beard Buckley

Maine mAGAZINE

They say you have seven seconds to make a good first impression. But when Susan MacKay stood before a full house of Maine Angel investors to present her new business, there were, true to Maine interconnectedness, many familiar faces in the room. Many of the Angels were already familiar with her business plan and had watched MacKay evolve through the state's Top Gun mentorship program. Now she was hoping she could demonstrate how far she'd come. It was harder in some ways, remembers MacKay.

 Photograph by Kelly Chase

Photograph by Kelly Chase

Boston magazine

Paradise Found…Nearby
Looking for a luxe getaway close to home? These fabulous mini moons approximate far-flung locales, sans pricey airfare and travel stress.

 Photograph by Kelly Chase

Photograph by Kelly Chase

Maine magazine

As we climb north, way north, snowdrifts deepen and less and less grass peeks up from beneath the frozen landscape. For hours we cruise past woods where the forest is deep green, thick, and vast. The forest offers seclusion and recreation, but for many, I learn as we fly by lumber mills, paper mills, and tree farms, it’'s a means of livelihood.

 Photograph by Elizabeth Cecil

Photograph by Elizabeth Cecil

Cape Cod Magazine

Two cookbook authors encountered separate obstacles when it came to preparing the final meal of the day. Susie Middleton faced the challenge of coming up with fresh and flavorful vegetarian meals each night. Sarah Waldman had to feed her family of four. Yet the two prevailed under a common philosophy—a delicious dinner made with your own two hands is of the utmost importance to a great quality of life.